Update on Salafi attacks in upscale Tunis suburb of La Marsa

[Update: The ruling party has released a statement on these events, condemning and calling for the prosecution of both the artists and the vandals, my English translation of the statement can be found here.]

It was only moments after I posted this article that the Tweets started rolling in. Something big was happening in La Marsa related to the art exhibit that had been attacked yesterday. I left the house at around 11:30 p.m. to see what was going on in. By the time I arrived at Tunisie Telecom, in the heart of La Marsa, just steps away from the French Ambassador’s residence, the evidence was already there – broken bottles, tear gas canisters and rock piles. And then all of a sudden I found myself surrounded by military and police vehicles telling me to get the heck away as they moved in to arrest a handful of young rioters.

The rioting continued for the next several hours (it’s still going on as I write). Curious and concerned onlookers would give each other reports from friends and family, mostly about the expected arrival of reinforcements from nearby cities, especially La Goulette and le Kram, to coastal towns known for Salafi activity.

Much like during the revolution, the riots ebbed and flowed, with protesters surging against the police only to be driven away by speeding paddy wagons and lobs of tear gas. It was unclear how many of the rioters were truly “salafists” – the catch all word for religious extremists in Tunisia. In fact, from what I say, there were a fair number of run of the mill young hoodlums having a lot of fun throwing rocks at the police, with thoughts of the apostates far from their minds. Nevertheless, the religious overtones were there, with each surge came chants of God is great.

Tonight’s protests were based as much on the images displayed in the art exhibit as they were on contempt for the country’s elite, who live largely in La Marsa. The elite are perceived as out of touch and disrespectful of religion. And the reality is that when it comes to puritanical forms of Islam, the protesters are largely correct. The story will play big in tomorrow’s papers and risks spreading rapidly through a society that is more polarized than ever before.

The pity of tonight’s protests, on top of spreading intolerance and polarization, is that it is exactly what the country does not need at this point. Tourism is only just recovering and foreign investors have held on tenuously to their ventures in the country, waiting for a return to stability. Rioting in the hometown of most of Tunisia’s business community as well as a symbol of its summer beach culture will do no favors to either industry.

4 thoughts on “Update on Salafi attacks in upscale Tunis suburb of La Marsa

  1. Pingback: Ennahda statement on La Marsa artwork calls for criminal prosecution of artists | Kefteji

  2. Pingback: Culture wars: Salafi attacks in La Marsa target heart of Tunisian secularism | Kefteji

  3. Pingback: Political brinkmanship creates major risks for Tunisian revolution | Kefteji

  4. Well just stop art and other free expressions, spray-paint the walls of as many foreigners and hotels with bars as possible, hassle people buying alcohol at Carrefour, close all the clubs and bars. Then when the tourists stay away and the devil foreigners leave, the rings called economy will become clear. The tourists rode in taxis and busses, the hotels bought linens, toiletries, glasses, gave jobs to porters, waiters, entertainers, the vehicles needed tyres and servicing and cleaning, petrol and paid for parking……so the rings will spread and when the shops start closing because the employees of all these industries are no longer employed and cannot in turn buy their food, furniture and so on……everyone can sit home and read the Koran and be happy…….

    Right…

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